Friday, January 16, 2015

Seven Vintage Postcards of Bryce Canyon in Utah

Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

This road tunnel in Red Canyon is not really a part of Bryce Canyon National Park.  However, as one leaves Highway 89 and approaches Bryce, the road enters Red Canyon and winds up the west side of the plateau from which the formations of Bryce are carved.  In the opinion of some, the beauty of Red Canyon "steals the show" from Bryce.
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Bryce Canyon from Rainbow Point

From Rainbow point, the southernmost spot reached by highway, the observer can look northward over most of the Park area, and see some 30 miles of Pink Cliffs.  Included in this panorama are beautiful amphitheaters of Black Birch Canyon and Agua Canyon, and magnificent views across "the land of the purple sage" to Navajo Mountain, 80 miles to the east, and Trumbull Mountains, 99 miles south.
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Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

This towering formation, named Gulliver's Castle, is a fine example of what nature can do with her tools of wind and water.  Erosion has been at work on these soft sandstone deposits for countless generations.  Old forms are gradually being worn away and new ones begin.  But the process is so slow that living memory is hardly long enough to note a major change.
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The Temple
Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

Resembling the Mormon Temple in Salt Lake City, this intriguing formation is only one of thousands to be seen in spectacular Bryce Canyon - a horseshoe-shaped amphitheater cut by water erosion, and extending down a thousand feet through pink and white limestone.  The ever-changing shadows create a thrilling panorama for the observer, with colors blending from white and gold to deep red and purple.
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Queen's Castle, Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

Of the many fantastic formations in the great horseshoe-shaped bowl, the Queen's Castle is one of the most interesting.  Wind and water have carved the pink and white limestone into myriads of unusual forms and figures.
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Fairyland, Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

The beautifully-colored formation formed by wind and erosion through many ages is called Fairyland because of its fantastic figures and weird castle shapes. 
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Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

A vast amphitheater shaped like a bowl, Bryce Canyon is twelve miles long and two miles wide, its walls rising in sculptured terraces and pinnacles 800 feet above the pine-covered floor of the canyon.

1 comment:

kingway Kinga said...

Exciting formations :) I collect postcards of the national parks of the United States, but these cards are missing out on the park name.